@sir That's... a much better way of doing it than I tried. I made a separate repo that was out of the way, then made an install script that would make symlinks for all the files I wanted.

That combined with a branch for each different machine just made it all a bit of a mess really. I should clean it all up at some point.

@OTheB that's similar to what I originally did, it was a mess

@sir thanks for the article.

i made own repos for every important programs, but your way is way more comfortable ^^
@sir That's very similar to how I keep track of my dotfiles. I use branches assigned to different OS to define what set of dotfiles to install.

I'm not sure my method is the best way. But it works well for my workflow.

@sir I've found using vcsh quite convenient, as it allows having multiple git repositories in ~/ but obviously it's more complicated than a single repo.

@sir i don't understand why you need the gitignore file, I get by without it and never had problems, moreover - when i issue `git status` it shows me files that i staged to commit, modified tracked files, AND the list of new untracked files, so when i feel the need to commit I skim through that list and check if i don't forget to include any of the new files. very handy

@tho @sir i do status.showUntrackedFiles=no in repo's git-config, and i use a bare git repo

@sir I have a similar setup but I put the .git directory in ~/.dotfiles instead of ~.

I then use this alias to interact with my git repository: `alias dgit='git --git-dir ~/.dotfiles/.git --work-tree=$HOME'

This was the only way I found worked well with all search tools (eg: ripgrep, ack). Otherwise I had problems where these tools would skip files due to gitignore.

This isnt my original idea though, took it from electricmonk.nl/log/2015/06/22

@tomleb @sir I'm doing this as well. Together with Drew's multi host, multi arch, single repo.

In addition to the alias for one's public dotfiles, I have another repo/alias for private stuff too, so the two basically just overlay my $HOME.

Having these two aliases is quite advantageous, I think. It also avoids undesirable habitual commits to my dotfiles, when I think I'm in an "actual" git directory.

@sir Neat one, only difference with mine is doing it one-branch-per-host instead so that it works with configurations that do not have include-ability. (Also not using it on my phone yet but I should)

Did you try something similar for /etc files?

@sir I hadn't thought of just using ~/ as a repo, that's interesting. I keep mine in a directory and install with a script that manages all the symlinks: github.com/zacanger/dotfiles/b which has worked out pretty well for the past year or two

Sign in to participate in the conversation
Mastodon

The social network of the future: No ads, no corporate surveillance, ethical design, and decentralization! Own your data with Mastodon!