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Hey welcome to our instructional video on CPR. Remember to smash that like and subscribe button! This video is sponsored by VPN SERVICE. Use promo code LIFESAVER to get 20% off the privelege of having all of your internet traffic sold to China.

Okay, so to perform CPR---

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Feel free to substitute the CPR metaphor with children's programming for a similar effect

@sir did you forget to re-enable your ad blocker?

@sir i've noticed that trying to listen to NPR online is like this. no other public radio has so many commercials, or even any.

@lyliawisteria @sir

some Dutch public radio stations do have adverts, I was listening to one on FM during "tropo lift" (weather conditions that make the signal cross the North Sea for varying amounts of time) and it was adverts for the entire time the station could be received (about 3,5 minutes).

I now fully understand why the older folk there still run pirate radio stations in their 70s 😁

@vfrmedia @sir probably also because they could afford radio stuff when they were younger, to learn how to do it.

there's a bit of "millenials are killing HAM" going around, because, straight up, nobody can afford the gear and licensing.

@lyliawisteria @sir

its more an issue of learning the skills - unlike ham kit which *is* expensive and there is lots of gatekeeping, building a "stentor" or similar relatively low power transmitter, (the PCB shown in my profile header above the cat avatar is one) was affordable even to teenagers in the 80s (me and my mates did it) - modern electronics can be overwhelming to younger folk (I teach them how transmitters work as part of volunteering at the two community radio stations in my area)

@lyliawisteria @sir

Another main reason its mostly older folk doing it in NL is they live in the rural bits near the German border and have access to space/land as well; if you do it in the towns/cities Agentschap Telecom and the Politie will discover and close down the station a lot quicker and/or accuse everyone involved of being mixed up with drugs/gangs, so the younger folk stick to online streaming (also broadband and LTE mobiles are more reliable in cities)

@vfrmedia @sir the decline of radio buffs is probably tied directly to the decline of trades, and specifically, electrical engineering. our public schools also teach people to hate school and discourage learning anything out of self-interest. it involves using math, so there's another door shut - those skills are declining every year because the school system is built for an economy that doesn't exist anymore.

@lyliawisteria @sir

its also not as easy as it once was to get hold of "full sized" through hole components (many have been discontinued) which are easier to work with when starting to learn electronics - working with SMD for small hobby projects can be like BDSM - some might enjoy it, but for others its genuinely too much pain...

@lyliawisteria
I was mostly absent from age ~12. I was permanently absent when I turned 15.
They could not have spread so little information over greater period of time. I cut a lot and went fishing and read a lot.
Much later on in life in my late 20's I wrote the normal gr12/A-level exams and went to college. Only took 6mos to make up gr9-12. Not a useless GED - the normal exams. HS is a free babysitting service for corporations. College was AWESOME though :-)
@vfrmedia @sir

@gemlog @vfrmedia @sir

i mostly haven't ever been great with math, except for when i actually need to use it for real things. even then, trig always ends up tripping me up, and trying to learn anything beyond that was pretty confusing. then i went to trade school in my mid-20s and found what i had been missing.. all of the practical application they would never fucking tell us about in public school!

@lyliawisteria
I hear you man. I think I may have lucked out a bit with that one, although I didn't realize it until a few years after I left HS. Not bad with maths.
And right-angled triangles are practical and useful. A very good old carpenter friend only knows 3,4,5 for making a square frame or ... anything really. I have no idea which culture this elementary school mnemonic was meant to exploit, but Chief SohCahToa is ingrained in me still... African? Americas? Hawaian? :-)
@vfrmedia @sir

@gemlog
i learned that mnemonic in canadian public school too. i think it contributed to my lack of understanding, because it was drilled into us with no other way to think about how to solve those problems.

in one, and only one, of the tech math courses i took in trade school, i was taught *completely different ways to think about trig problems* that suddenly made some things make a lot more sense.

also, i think declaring the slide rule obsolete was a bad idea.

@vfrmedia @sir

@lyliawisteria
Can you tell me about how math was taught in trade school? It sounds interesting. Also what applications you found for it in your work later.
@vfrmedia @sir

@gemlog
it's been 12 years, so i don't remember exactly what the process was anymore, but it involved using circles and radians, instead of just line lengths and degrees. i never really found too much use for it in any work later on, but that's mostly because trig still hasn't stuck in my head. i never ended up being employed as a machinist for very long :P

@vfrmedia @sir

@lyliawisteria
Yes. Using the unit circle clears up a lot of fluff! :-)
@vfrmedia @sir

@lyliawisteria @sir @vfrmedia Yup, that and millennials are doing crazy stuff with smartphones and routers for effectively the same niche in the unlicensed bands, like #ServalMesh

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